10 Crohn’s Friendly Recipes

Crohn’s and Colitis Awareness Week

Cooking-With-Crohns-Recipes-04-1440x810

While what you eat isn’t a surefire way to cause, or cure, Crohn’s disease, certain foods may trigger a flare or make your symptoms worse. Eating a healthy diet can help you manage your nutrition intake, which is especially important during a flare-up. However, knowing which foods to eat or avoid isn’t always easy. Crohn’s disease affects everyone differently, and you’ll need to figure out what works — or doesn’t work — for you. Some common food triggers include spicy, fatty, and gas-producing foods, and many people with Crohn’s need to limit dairy products and high-fiber foods such as whole grains and beans. But that doesn’t mean your diet needs to be bland. Try the following recipes to spice up your meals. If any of the ingredients are known problem foods for you, you can get creative with substitutions.

Click the link below to be transfered to the Everyday Health recipes!

https://www.everydayhealth.com/crohns-disease/diet/crohns-friendly-recipes/#01

5 new life-saving cancer developments New studies are paving the way for faster diagnosis, better treatment — and more lives saved.

Article Source: https://www.mnn.com/health/fitness-well-being/blogs/new-life-saving-cancer-developments
Cancer researcer

Cancer is complex, but researchers are breaking new ground in understanding the many types of the disease. (Photo: science photo/Shutterstock)

Cancer. We’re all touched by it in one way or another, whether we are survivors ourselves, or our friends or loved ones have been affected by the disease. But while the statistics are sometimes grim — the number of new cancer cases is projected to rise to 22 million within the next 20 years, according to the World Health Organization— there are also rays of light in cancer research that offers hope for better options when it comes to diagnosis, treatment and a cure.

Here’s a snapshot of four breakthroughs happening right now in cancer research that are certain to save lives in the near future.

1. New tools to fight childhood cancer

Childhood cancerBy creating maps of childhood cancer tumors and sharing them with the world, researchers have opened the door for new breakthroughs in diagnosis and treatment. (Photo: frantab/Shutterstock)

Cancer is complex, as each type causes a unique reaction within the body and reacts differently to treatment. Now, thanks to a team of U.S. scientists at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI), researchers around the world will have models of 12 common types of childhood cancer that they can use to better understand these complex reactions and test how various treatments will affect different cancer cells.

The team grew cells from patient tumors in mice and created nearly 100 models of 12 types of pediatric cancer, HHMI said in a statement. They’re making the samples available for free to the scientific community by publishing their data in the journal Nature. This new wealth of information is predicted to break open many areas of childhood cancer research.

The 12 cancers they modeled are:

  • Neuroblastoma
  • Osteosarcoma
  • Rhabdomyosarcoma
  • Retinoblastoma
  • Wilms tumours
  • Ewing sarcomas
  • High-grade sarcoma
  • Malignant rhabdoid tumour
  • Synovial sarcoma
  • Renal medullary carcinoma
  • Desmoplastic small round cell tumor
  • Epithelioid sarcoma

2. Breakthroughs in immunotherapy treatment

T cells attacking cancer cellIn this illustration, T-cells (gray) can be seen attacking a cancer cell (hot pink). (Photo: royaltystockphoto.com/Shutterstock)

Current treatment options for cancer include chemotherapy, radiation and immunotherapy, which means using the body’s own immune system to fend off the disease. Of the three, immunotherapy is the least devastating to the body as a whole because it relies on targeted cancer destruction rather than attacking all of the cells in the general area of the cancer. So a breakthrough in cancer immunotherapy treatment is a big deal. Recently, there have been two.

The Food and Drug Administration recently approved the use of a new cell-based gene therapy to treat acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), which is a cancer of blood and bone marrow and the most common childhood cancer in the U.S. The treatment involved removing cells from a patient’s own immune system, genetically modifying them to kill cancer cells, and then sending them back into the patient to wipe out the disease.

The drug is called Kymriah, or CAR-T-cell therapy, and it is changing the outcome for patients with this type of cancer. In a clinical study, 63 ALL patients were given the treatment after their cancer failed to respond to other treatment methods. After three months, 83 percent of those patients were in remission.

In another immunotherapy research breakthrough, a team of scientists lead by researchers at the National Cancer Institute have identified the specific genes that can help improve success with the treatment. In the past, doctors have been baffled when certain tumors don’t respond to immunotherapy treatment. This study identified 100 genes that play a role in the immunotherapy process. With this information, doctors can more easily identify issues that could hinder treatment, such as a malfunction in one of the identified genes.

Researchers are hoping this study will serve as a blueprint to help cancer scientists better understand immunotherapy and develop new treatments to circumvent resistant tumors.

3. Advances in melanoma diagnoses

Dermatologist inspecting a new moleNew mole? It’s more likely to be melanoma than a mole you’ve had for a long time. (Photo: Pop Paul-Catalin/Shutterstock)

Check those moles and stay on top of what your skin looks like. A team of Italian and Greek researchers published a study in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology that says new moles are more likely to pop up as the result of melanoma. The team also found that when melanoma does develop from an existing mole, it’s likely to be thinner than those that come from new moles, suggesting a better possible outcome for the patient. Armed with this new knowledge, doctors can make better and more immediate recommendations for their skin cancer patients.

4. A link between breast cancer and heart health

Woman with breast cancer ribbonCould cholesterol medications be a new option for breast cancer prevention? (Photo: Dolores Giraldez Alonso/Shutterstock)

What’s the link between breast cancer and heart health? Researchers recently presented a study at the European Society of Cardiology Congress in Barcelona that found women with a history of high cholesterol tend to have lower rates of breast cancer, suggesting that statin drugs — often prescribed to treat high cholesterol — may also offer protective benefits when it comes to breast cancer.

In a review that included more than 32,000 women — half with high cholesterol and half without — researchers found that women who were taking statin medications to control their high cholesterol were 33 percent less likely to develop breast cancer than those whose cholesterol levels were normal. And the women with high cholesterol who did develop breast cancer were 40 percent less likely to die over the 14-year study period than women who had developed breast cancer but did not have high cholesterol.

The study’s authors don’t know for sure why women with high cholesterol would have a lower incidence and a higher survival rate for breast cancer, but they think it might have something to do with the statin drugs, which not only reduce cholesterol but also have been shown to reduce overall inflammation in the body. This finding could help improve treatment options for women battling the disease.

5. A pen that detects cancer during surgery

This last development in cancer research isn’t as far along as some of the others on this list, but a handheld device called the MasSpec Pen is so revolutionary that it warranted an honorable mention, so to speak.

The pen-shaped device is designed to help surgeons determine if tissue is cancerous, which means they’re able to remove more of a cancerous tumor during a surgery with less risk of leaving any cancerous tissue behind. It takes a small sample of molecules from the tissue through a drop of water at the tip of the pen, then passes them through a mass spectrometer. About 10 seconds later, it tells doctors whether the tissue is cancerous or not, and what kind of cancer it is.

“If you talk to cancer patients after surgery, one of the first things many will say is ‘I hope the surgeon got all the cancer out,’” Livia Schiavinato Eberlin, an assistant professor of chemistry at the University of Texas at Austin, who designed the study and led the team, said in a press release. “It’s just heartbreaking when that’s not the case. But our technology could vastly improve the odds that surgeons really do remove every last trace of cancer during surgery.”

This new invention is much faster than the current process, which UT Austin explains:

The current state-of-the-art method for diagnosing cancers and determining the boundary between cancer and normal tissue during surgery, called Frozen Section Analysis, is slow and sometimes inaccurate. Each sample can take 30 minutes or more to prepare and interpret by a pathologist, which increases the risk to the patient of infection and negative effects of anesthesia. And for some types of cancers, frozen section interpretation can be difficult, yielding unreliable results in as many as 10 to 20 percent of cases.

Though the pen has not yet gone through clinical trials, early tests suggest the pen is accurate about 96 percent of the time.

SLMA September – Cholesterol Awareness

Article Source: https://www.houmatimes.com/health_and_wellness/slma-september—cholesterol-awareness/article_93f7e882-9242-11e7-9f9b-b337abd6dd90.html

 

Back to school is just around the corner, but September is about more than just new books and school clothes, it’s also Cholesterol Awareness Month. Celebrate the start of fall by learning more about cholesterol and how you can help keep your body healthy.

What is Cholesterol?

We often hear and talk about cholesterol but may not know exactly what it means. Cholesterol actually isn’t a bad thing; it’s a waxy, soft, fat-like substance that our bodies need to produce cell membranes and other important substances. The liver produces the cholesterol needed by the body to function properly. But cholesterol also comes from the food we eat, specifically food from animals, like meat and full-fat dairy. These foods also contain saturated and trans fats which signal your liver to produce more cholesterol. This can result in levels that are too high. Nearly one-third of adults in the United States have high cholesterol levels.

Types of Cholesterol

There are two types of cholesterol: low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL). LDL is known as bad cholesterol because it carries particles of cholesterol around your body in the bloodstream and leaves them on the walls of your arteries. This results in build up along the artery walls so they become hard and narrow. On the other hand, HDL is known as good cholesterol because it works to remove cholesterol from your bloodstream, taking it to the liver so it can be broken down. Having high levels of HDL and low levels of LDL is ideal.

Causes of High Cholesterol

A number of factors can influence your cholesterol levels, including the following:

● Obesity – Extra weight increases LDL levels

● Inactivity – Regular physical activity helps lower LDL and increase HDL

● Poor diet – Diets high in saturated fat and cholesterol increase the level of LDL in the bloodstream

● Family genetics – Your genes can impact how much cholesterol your body produces

● Age – Cholesterol levels rise with age

● Gender – Men often have higher cholesterol levels than women before menopause; after menopause, the levels tend to even out

Managing Cholesterol

Whether you have high cholesterol and want to lower your levels or you just want to prevent high cholesterol from developing, it’s important to focus on lifestyle changes. What you eat is an important part of fighting cholesterol, so work toward consuming a heart-healthy diet. Well-balanced diets focused on fiber-rich foods, fruits, vegetables and whole grains are key. You should also minimize the amount saturated and trans fats you consume, which are found in foods like meat, full-fat dairy, fried food and store-bought baked goods. Here are some examples of heart-healthy foods to include in your diet:

● Barley

● Oatmeal

● Leafy greens

● Avocado

● Nuts

● Salmon

● Beans

● Eggplant

● Soybeans

● Black tea

● Garlic

Regular physical activity is also important. Aim for at least 30 minutes of aerobic exercise five days week. Other lifestyle changes can also help lower cholesterol, including reducing stress, losing weight and quitting smoking.

Cholesterol Medication

Managing cholesterol should focus on making lifestyle changes. However, if you are working on changing your lifestyle and are struggling to bring down your cholesterol levels, then talk to your doctor. They may prescribe certain medications, including fibrates, statins and niacin, to help lower cholesterol. These medications may be taken individually or in combination; your doctor will determine what is appropriate for you.

Test Your Cholesterol

Having your cholesterol tested is the only way to know what your levels are like. A simple blood test determines your current levels. The most common cholesterol screening is a lipid profile; it measures the level of fats in your blood, including cholesterol. It’s recommended that people over age 20 get a cholesterol screening at least once every five years, but certain factors make it better for some people to get tested more often. Optimal cholesterol levels are as follows:

● Total cholesterol below 200 mg/dL

● HDL at 60 mg/dL or above

● LDL below 100 mg/dL

Dangers of High Cholesterol

Although it’s usually impossible to determine if you have high cholesterol without a blood test, that doesn’t mean it isn’t impacting your body and health. If left unchecked, high cholesterol can contribute to a number of health problems. The biggest problem is a buildup of cholesterol in your arteries that combines with other substances and leads to the formation of plaque. This buildup of plaque in your arteries is known as atherosclerosis. As the plaque deposits continue to grow, they narrow the space inside your arteries. This restricts the flow of blood. A clot that develops in your bloodstream can easily become stuck in an area where the arteries are narrowed, completely blocking the flow of blood. If your blood can’t carry oxygen to your heart or brain, then a heart attack or stroke will occur.

When to See Your Doctor

It’s important to talk to your doctor about testing your cholesterol levels. Many times you won’t notice high cholesterol until it’s too late. Regular screenings can determine your cholesterol levels so you can take appropriate action if necessary. In addition, if you notice chest pain it’s important to see your doctor right away. This can be a sign that the blood flow to your heart is restricted.

Managing your cholesterol levels is an important part of overall health, particularly heart health. Celebrate Cholesterol Awareness Month by talking to your doctor about getting a cholesterol screening. Then choose a lifestyle change to work on for better heart health.

Everything You Need to Know About the Yellow Fever Vaccine

Article source: http://www.travelandleisure.com/trip-ideas/yoga-wellness/yellow-fever-vaccine

The Yellow Fever Virus

Yellow fever, a viral hemorrhagic disease caused by the yellow fever virus, affects roughly 200,000 people a year. Though the disease got its start in Africa, outbreaks have occurred as far away as the Yucatan Peninsula and even Philadelphia, where 5,000 people were wiped out during a single epidemic in the 18th century.

Related: What You Need to Know About Vaccines

Typically, yellow fever causes, chills, nausea, vomiting, muscle pain, and — of course — a fever. It’s certainly not a pleasant way to spend any part of your trip. While most people recover after 3 or 4 days, some experience a second wave of afflictions, which can bring jaundice (hence the name), abdominal pain and vomiting, and bleeding from the mouth, nose, and eyes. In cases where yellow fever has developed past this point, the risk of death is about 50 percent.

Back in the day, yellow fever was no joke. A single outbreak had the power to annihilate huge groups of people in small areas, though the cause of the illness eluded doctors. It wasn’t until the 1900s that they determined yellow fever was transmitted by mosquitoes.

The Yellow Fever Vaccine

Per the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, there is no cure for yellow fever. Instead, patients are treated based on their symptoms (described above), and on their recent travel history.

While a vaccine is recommended for any travel to Africa or South America, other important prevention methods include mosquito nets, wearing clothes that cover the entire body, and using a strong insect repellent with DEET.

The yellow fever vaccine was developed by Max Theiler in the United States, and he won the Nobel Prize for this life-saving contribution. Unlike other vaccines, the yellow fever vaccine is a one-time deal: a single dose provides lifetime immunity. (Travelers who frequently visit at-risk areas should get a booster shot ever 10 years.)

The vaccine can be given to infants as young as 9 months, and is recommended for anyone traveling to certain areas in Africa and South America.

As with most vaccines, an amount of time is needed for the vaccine to work its way through your body, and it’s recommended that you schedule the vaccine appointment 10 days prior to traveling.

The yellow fever vaccine is only offered at designated vaccination centers, and can cost between $150 and $350, depending on availability. Certain countries, including Ghana, Liberia, and Sierra Leone, even require a proof of vaccination from all travelers when they arrive — and that certificate is obtained from your doctor after being given the shot.

PCOS Is a Lifelong Disorder: ‘Be Vigilant’

Article Source: http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/879174

Among the diseases that most people tend to get confused about is polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). PCOS affects between 10% and 15% of all women worldwide.[1,2] In fact, most studies have indicated that the incidence is almost the same worldwide.[2]

What Is PCOS?

PCOS is a disease that affects the endocrine, metabolic, and reproductive systems. It is detrimental to a woman’s quality of life and results in long-term morbidity. We generally consider PCOS to have three components, but you only need two of the three components to make the diagnosis. These components are hyperandrogenism (evidence of excess male hormones like hirsutism or high androgen levels), evidence of irregular ovulation (generally reflected in irregular menstruation), and evidence of polycystic ovaries, most often detected on ultrasound.[2,3]

Who Should Be Screened for PCOS?

We should screen women who present with a complaint of unwanted hair growth—it does not matter whether you actually see it or not—and women who complain of irregular menstrual cycles.

A good history and physical examination are essential. If you think you have a patient with PCOS, it is very critical that you obtain a very thorough medical history and examine the patient carefully. Exclude other disorders such as adrenal hyperplasia, thyroid dysfunction, and hyperprolactinemia.[3] To do so, check 17-hydroxyprogesterone, thyroid-stimulating hormone, and prolactin levels.

If the patient does not have a lot of hirsutism and you are unsure whether she has excess male hormones, obtain total and free testosterone levels.[3] Use a very good laboratory. Mass spectrometry is the best way to determine whether these women have elevated levels of androgens. However, not all women with PCOS have elevated levels of androgens in their blood, and it is not necessary for the diagnosis of PCOS. You can make the diagnosis using the clinical picture and excluding other disorders as mentioned.

What Comes After a Diagnosis of PCOS?

Women with PCOS require long-term care because many of them are at increased risk for diabetes and glucose intolerance—problems that raise their risk for heart disease and other conditions.

The recommendation today is that all women with PCOS should undergo a glucose tolerance test. A 2-hour, 75-g glucose tolerance test should tell you whether the patient is diabetic.[4] It is also okay to check an insulin level during the test, because that will give you an idea about whether the insulin level is high during the glucose tolerance test.

About 75%-85% of women with PCOS have metabolic dysfunction and are at increased risk for diabetes and heart disease.[2] You need to pay attention to their glucose tolerance and their lipid levels. They need to be counseled about weight loss, lifestyle modification, eating better, and treating all of the other risk factors that we know about.

For a patient with PCOS, once you have counseled her about the disease and have done the tests for glucose intolerance, determine what you are going to tell her over the long term. It is your job to make sure that she continues to receive care and understands that this is a lifelong disorder.

PCOS is the single most common endocrine metabolic disorder of humans, affecting up to 15% of women.[1] You should never forget it and should always be vigilant.

A Rosy Outlook for Pregnancy & Lupus

Article Source: http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/878764

sle_lupus_research_plasma_autoimmune_pregnancy.jpg

There was a time when women diagnosed with lupus were cautioned against getting pregnant; the combination of lupus and pregnancy was thought to be too dangerous for mother and child. However, research by Jane Salmon, MD, a rheumatologist at the Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) in New York City, is now helping change this belief. By carefully risk-stratifying patients on the basis of clinical and biological markers, it seems that the vast majority of pregnant patients with lupus can be assured that their pregnancies will be uncomplicated. Medscape recently spoke to Dr Salmon about her work.

Medscape: Tell us a little about how you began studying pregnancy and lupus.

Dr Salmon: Patients with lupus tend to be young women in their reproductive years. Lupus generally presents between age 20 and 40 years, and 90% of the patients are women. Some of the first questions they often ask when they receive their diagnosis are, “Can I have children?” “Will my pregnancy be safe?” and “Will my children have lupus?”

In the 1980s, when I was training in rheumatology, the feeling was that pregnancy in lupus was dangerous. This wasn’t based on strong evidence, but on the rational concept that because lupus tends to be a disease of women, hormones may play a role in disease pathogenesis, and pregnancy is a state with high levels of female hormones (ie, estrogens, progesterone). Thus, it was anticipated that patients with lupus who become pregnant would have severe flares. And in fact, patients who become pregnant when their disease is active and not well-controlled often develop even more severe organ dysfunction. So there was clinical basis for the anxiety among the physicians, but perhaps it was applied too broadly.

Medscape: How has your research helped changed this way of thinking?

Dr Salmon: Patients asked for and deserve data around such an important question. They wanted the evidence that, in fact, this was true. And we wanted to identify the predictors of poor pregnancy outcomes and the mechanisms that caused damage to the placenta and the developing baby.