10 Crohn’s Friendly Recipes

Crohn’s and Colitis Awareness Week

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While what you eat isn’t a surefire way to cause, or cure, Crohn’s disease, certain foods may trigger a flare or make your symptoms worse. Eating a healthy diet can help you manage your nutrition intake, which is especially important during a flare-up. However, knowing which foods to eat or avoid isn’t always easy. Crohn’s disease affects everyone differently, and you’ll need to figure out what works — or doesn’t work — for you. Some common food triggers include spicy, fatty, and gas-producing foods, and many people with Crohn’s need to limit dairy products and high-fiber foods such as whole grains and beans. But that doesn’t mean your diet needs to be bland. Try the following recipes to spice up your meals. If any of the ingredients are known problem foods for you, you can get creative with substitutions.

Click the link below to be transfered to the Everyday Health recipes!

https://www.everydayhealth.com/crohns-disease/diet/crohns-friendly-recipes/#01

Arthritis in America

Everyone knows someone with arthritis. It is a leading cause of disability, and causes pain, aching, stiffness, and swelling of the joints, but is not a normal part of aging. The most common types are osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, gout, lupus, and fibromyalgia. Arthritis costs at least $81 billion in direct medical costs annually. Many adults with arthritis are prescribed opioid medicines, yet other options for pain are safer. Physical activity can decrease pain and improve physical function by about 40% and may reduce healthcare costs. Still, 1 in 3 adults with arthritis are inactive. Adults with arthritis also can reduce their symptoms by participating in disease management education programs. Only 1 in 10 have taken part in these programs. Adults with arthritis are significantly more likely to attend an education program when recommended by a provider.

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Arthritis is common and a growing health threat.

Arthritis is common in adults.
  • About 1 in 4 (54 million) adults have arthritis.
  • More than half of adults with arthritis (32 million) are of working age (18-64 years).
Arthritis is disabling.
  • The percent of adults limited by arthritis has increased by about 20% since 2002. The everyday activities of 24 million adults are limited by it, such as holding a cup, lifting a grocery bag, or walking to a car.
  • More than 1 in 4 adults with arthritis report severe joint pain.
  • Adults with arthritis are more than twice as likely as adults without arthritis to report an injury related to a fall.
  • Working-age adults with arthritis have lower employment than those without arthritis.
Arthritis makes it harder to manage heart disease, diabetes or obesity.
  • About half of adults with heart disease (49%) or diabetes (47%) have arthritis, as do one-third (31%) of those who are obese.
  • About half the adults with arthritis who also have heart disease, diabetes or obesity, have some limitation of their normal activities because of their arthritis.
  • Physical activity helps manage all these conditions.
  • Increased pain, fear of pain, and lack of knowledge of safe forms of physical activity can make it harder for people with arthritis to be physically active.

Full article from the CDC. Source: here.

If you have been diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis, you might be eligible to donate plasma or a blood specimen and earn $600 or more. Visit www.plasmamedpatients.com for more info or call/text 561-962-5065.

15 Surprising Facts About Rheumatoid Arthritis

“RA doesn’t exist in mummies, and there is no evidence that it existed in the Old World before Christopher Columbus discovered America in 1492,” says Martin J. Bergman, MD, the chief of the division of rheumatology at Taylor Hospital, in Ridley Park, Pa.

“This suggests it may be caused by an environmental factor, but that has never been proven,” he says.

View complete article here.

If you have been diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis, you might be eligible to donate plasma or a blood specimen and earn $600 or more. Visit www.plasmamedpatients.com for more info or call/text 561-962-5065.

What, Me Donate Plasma for Research?

The reasons are fairly obvious and straightforward. Research undertaken in the past by committed and forward-thinking people has given us a standard of living and life expectancies that would have been unimaginable not that long ago. It’s easy to take all of this for granted. Treatments for diseases that were deadly and intractable didn’t come out of a vacuum. Every one of us is healthier, happier, and some of us are actually still alive, solely because some nameless people made a commitment to research.

Participation in research studies comes in a few broad categories. Some studies seek only patient records in order to establish trends and extract data on the relative successes and failures of various treatment modalities. Other studies administer investigational drugs to patients in double-blind trials as part of the final phases of their approval. At Plasma MedResearch, LLC, we recruit patients for a third type of study. Our participants donate biospecimens in the form of plasma or blood samples along with various other body tissues and fluids as research requirements dictate. These patients are then compensated for their donation, time and travel, depending on the study and the specimen given.

Why are people reluctant to get involved? There are many reasons ranging from logistics, family/work responsibilities, impaired health, lack of mobility, and privacy concerns. These are all very valid reasons to take a pass on participating. In this day and age people are simply not comfortable having their personal information “out there”. This is understandable. Anyone who works with Plasma MedResearch, LLC, can rest assured that their personal information is protected. We meet and exceed all existing HIPAA and regulatory requirements for the safeguarding of personal information. Our commitment to our donors’ privacy cannot overstated.

We serve biotechnology companies, pharmaceutical companies, and Universities around the world. Our capabilities include a wide range of disease-state biospecimens, from Arthritis to Zika. People who consider donating often ask to know what research institution will be using their specimen and the exact nature of the study. Although this is a great question, it is not possible to answer. Regulations require a strict de-linking between donor and researcher. The most important part of this that researchers cannot know any identifying information about the person who provided the specimen. This is a critical protection for the donor. But, as a consequence, the donor cannot be privy to information about the people and company(ies) doing the actual research.

The selfless act of donating a specimen to a particular research study will have a positive ripple effect down through the generations, improving the quality of life on planet Earth.